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Who is Hannah?

I’m a maker, writer and content creator based in London.

I’m also a master of theoretical physics, so if you’ve got any burning questions about superfluidity in thin helium films, I’m ya gal.

After my degree, I realised that I love explaining science and tech just about as much as I love doing it, so I spent a few years working for New Scientist magazine as a subeditor and writer.

I did a bunch of cool stuff during my time there, including a livestream dressed as Seven of Nine from Star Trek, and a workshop to become fluent in a made-up language called Toki Pona in just 48 hours.

I ended up becoming the magazine’s resident maker when I created a column specialising in charmingly overcomplicated solutions to everyday problems. Some of my favourite examples include a pair of shoes that can call you a cab, a coaster that uses cat pictures to stop you from drunk-tweeting, an Alexa-connected pedal pin and a cake cutting robot, amongst others. I stuck electronics in everything from Halloween pumpkins to a taxidermy stoat.

I’m a maker, writer and content creator based in London.

I’m also a master of theoretical physics, so if you’ve got any burning questions about superfluidity in thin helium films, I’m ya gal.

After my degree, I realised that I love explaining science and tech just about as much as I love doing it, so I spent a few years working for New Scientist magazine as a subeditor and writer.

I did a bunch of cool stuff during my time there, including a livestream dressed as Seven of Nine from Star Trek, and a workshop to become fluent in a made-up language called Toki Pona in just 48 hours.

I ended up becoming the magazine’s resident maker when I created a column specialising in charmingly overcomplicated solutions to everyday problems. Some of my favourite examples include a pair of shoes that can call you a cab, a coaster that uses cat pictures to stop you from drunk-tweeting, an Alexa-connected pedal pin and a cake cutting robot, amongst others. I stuck electronics in everything from Halloween pumpkins to a taxidermy stoat.

The response to those articles led me on to “How to be a Maker” – a series of articles helping beginners take their first steps into hobby electronics, from basic circuits to building an autonomous biscuit-carrying robot in 10 weekly instalments. (The sequel covered DIY projects for your garden.)

These days you can find my projects here, on this website, or over at my YouTube channel. I do a combination of small electronics, programming, 3D printing and tech-inspired craft. For example, I’ve cross-stitched QR codes and tried to teach neural nets how to draw dot-to-dot patterns (they’re not very good at it).

My work has been featured on the Arduino blog and Hackaday among other places.

You can spot me out in the wild sometimes – for example, I’ve spoken at events such as the East End Film Festival in London, and been on the judging panel for Electronics Weekly’s Elektra awards for the last couple of years.

I’m also part cyborg, thanks to the RFID chip implanted in my hand. But perhaps that’s how you found this website – my favourite party trick having people scan my hand with their phones, leading them here.

If you’ve got a project or opportunity you think I might be interested in, feel free to drop me a message over on the contact page.